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Here’s a great way to visualize the huge potential of forest conservation and restoration as ‘natural climate solutions’

Recent research found that 20 different “natural climate solutions” have the potential to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 23.8 billion metric tons every year — and that nearly half of that potential, or some 11.3 billion metric tons of emissions, represent what the study’s authors call “cost-effective climate mitigation.” The researchers behind the study defined “cost-effective” as including those relatively low-cost natural climate solutions that require less than $100 per ton of carbon dioxide emissions reduction per year. As Susan Minnemeyer, a mapping and data manager for the World Resources Institute (WRI) who co-authored the study, and colleagues point out, forest conservation and restoration, especially in the tropics, are a major component of these cost-effective climate mitigation strategies. It can be hard to visualize exactly how big of an impact a billions-of-tons-of-emissions reduction will actually make, but Minnemeyer and the other co-authors of a blog post on WRI’s website make it pretty easy. They note that halting deforestation, restoring forests that have already been logged or degraded, and improving forest management could cost-effectively remove seven billion metric tons of carbon dioxide from Earth’s atmosphere every year, which is equivalent to the annual emissions generated by 1.5 billion cars. That’s far more than the number of cars currently on the road around the world — according to the World Economic Forum, there won’t be 1.5 billion cars in the world until 2025. Stopping deforestation alone could lead to about 40 percent of the total emissions reductions achievable…

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Original Post by Mongabay

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